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Ripping audio from bluray DTS
Carlos Martinez
post Nov 28 2013, 10:28
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I have two bluray discs that I wish to rip the music in them to author and burn regular CDs.

Using Audacity I could export the audio onto a wav pcm file, which I still intend to edit with Soundforge to separate the individual songs. The problem is this file is 16-bit 48KHz.

As I will be using Exact Audio Copy to make the CDs, I wonder if I should convert the files to 44KHz too with Soundforge. Should I?

The other question is if there would be a way to author a 5.1 just music disc from the same blurays. I think the files would have to be compressed somehow, either with DTS or AC3. Would there be a way to do that, which would preserve the original quality as much as possible and still fit onto a CD or DVD? Which one?

I have already listened to both the 5.1 bluray and the 2-channel pcm on my high quality home system, through my network, and both sounded very good. The surround information only added minimal things to the music, and the 2-channel would be quite accurate anyway.

Any advice would be welcome.

This post has been edited by Carlos Martinez: Nov 28 2013, 10:36
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db1989
post Nov 28 2013, 22:05
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A heads-up: discussion of methods to bypass the DRM inherent to Blu-ray disks is forbidden by TOS #9, which will be enforced.

Surrounding subjects that do not involve digital circumvention of copy-protection are OK

This post has been edited by db1989: Nov 28 2013, 22:08
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gib
post Nov 28 2013, 23:11
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QUOTE (Carlos Martinez @ Nov 27 2013, 23:28) *
As I will be using Exact Audio Copy to make the CDs, I wonder if I should convert the files to 44KHz too with Soundforge. Should I?

http://src.infinitewave.ca/

Soundforge 9.0's resampling looks mediocre, but of course graphs don't necessarily tell you how something sounds and I don't know if you're even using version 9. I suspect it'd be fine.

That being said, it would be easy to instead use something like SoX which is known for excellent resampling, so I'd suggest that.

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Carlos Martinez
post Nov 29 2013, 02:17
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QUOTE (db1989 @ Nov 28 2013, 19:05) *
A heads-up: discussion of methods to bypass the DRM inherent to Blu-ray disks is forbidden by TOS #9, which will be enforced.

Surrounding subjects that do not involve digital circumvention of copy-protection are OK


Sorry, I thought I could do anything I wanted with a disc I bought.

The essence of my question is what the best program to use to convert my PCM wav files, which are 48KHz to 44KHz, and the Soundforge version I use is 8, not 9.
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DVDdoug
post Nov 29 2013, 03:41
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Soundforge should be able to do the conversion. Some resamplers "measure" better than others, but any resampler should be better than human hearing. I've converted back and forth between CD (44.1kHz) and DVD (48kHz), and I've never heard any difference, no matter what application I was using.

I assume Soundforge can also downmix 5.1 to stereo, as long as you have a 5.1 format that Soundforge can open.

Most DVDs that have surround also have a stereo track, although it's not required by the DVD spec. The DVD specs require that all DVD players can downmix to stereo. I don't know as much about Blu-Ray, but I assume most have stereo tracks.

QUOTE
The other question is if there would be a way to author a 5.1 just music disc from the same blurays. I think the files would have to be compressed somehow, either with DTS or AC3.
With DVD authoring software, sure. Most DVD authoring applications include an AC3 encoder, but I haven't seen one with a DTS encoder. Typically, an "audio only" disc will include a still image (sometimes blank-black) or an image showing text of the song title & artist. All DVD players are required to play AC3. DTS support is optional. So, commercial DVDs are required to have either an LPCM or AC3. Of course, your homemade DVD can have only a DTS track it that's what you want (and if your DVD authoring software will allow you to).

QUOTE
Sorry, I thought I could do anything I wanted with a disc I bought.
Most commercial DVDs & Blu-Ray discs are copy protected (CDs are not). In most countries, it's illegal to "crack" the copy protection. In the USA, we have the DMCA and you won't find DVD/Blu-Ray ripping/copying software in ligitimate software stores

This post has been edited by DVDdoug: Nov 29 2013, 03:46
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yourlord
post Nov 29 2013, 03:43
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QUOTE (Carlos Martinez @ Nov 28 2013, 20:17) *
Sorry, I thought I could do anything I wanted with a disc I bought.


Well, large media conglomerates have spent decades and billions of dollars making sure that the things you buy with your hard earned money never belong to you. It belongs to them, even after you buy it.
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Octocontrabass
post Nov 29 2013, 05:13
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QUOTE (Carlos Martinez @ Nov 28 2013, 01:28) *
The other question is if there would be a way to author a 5.1 just music disc from the same blurays.
If by "just music disc" you mean a video DVD that contains the DTS audio and a blank video, yes, this can be done. You can extract the DTS track directly from the M2TS streams (via the MPLS playlist) using eac3to. You can then multiplex the DTS stream with a blank video, although I can't remember off the top of my head what tools you'd need to do that. (I think ffmpeg and ifoedit is the combination I used, but there are probably better tools by now.)

On the other hand, if you're talking about a DTS Music Disc, you'll need to re-encode the audio.
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greynol
post Nov 29 2013, 06:49
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QUOTE (Carlos Martinez @ Nov 28 2013, 17:17) *
Sorry, I thought I could do anything I wanted with a disc I bought.

Even if it were true, that doesn't mean you can talk about it freely here.

That said, this...
QUOTE
The essence of my question is what the best program to use to convert my PCM wav files, which are 48KHz to 44KHz, and the Soundforge version I use is 8, not 9.
...is fair game.

This post has been edited by greynol: Nov 29 2013, 06:50


--------------------
Your eyes cannot hear.
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Carlos Martinez
post Nov 29 2013, 10:40
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By "music-only" DVD I mean exactly that: no video at all, just audio tracks.

It would have to be a DVD because of the size of the files, which would exceed a CD capacity.

EAC also does not author DVDs, AFAIK, does it? I would like a CD to play on any CD player.

So let's be objective:

1) I have a 2-channel stereo track that was downmixed from the 5.1 track. It's Microsoft wav. Only problem with that file is that it is 48KHz instead of CD's 44KHz. Resampling with Soundforge 8 would be fine or should I use other program? I will be splitting the music pieces from the dialogue anyway.

2) What is the best way to author a DVD disc with just the AC3 audio, no video?

This post has been edited by Carlos Martinez: Nov 29 2013, 10:42
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