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Interesting books
Gabriel
post Mar 19 2003, 10:45
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Inaugurating this section of the forum, I think that it could be usefull to have a list of interesting books.
So here is the list, one post per book in order to edit it with comments if needed.
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Gabriel
post Mar 19 2003, 10:53
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Psychoacoustics: Facts and Models
Eberhard Zwicker/Hugo Fastl

Review:
http://www.physicstoday.org/pt/vol-54/iss-6/p64.html

This book is a collection of data by Zwicker. Good ressource for hearing facts, nearly nothing about implementations of models.
Overall my own opinion is that this is a must have.
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Gabriel
post Mar 19 2003, 10:57
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Introduction to Digital Audio Coding and Standards
Marina Bosi/Richard E. Goldberg

link:
http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-7357-7

Seems interesting, but I do not have it so I am not sure. Deals with psychoacoustic models implementations.
Discount is available for mpeg members

This post has been edited by Gabriel: Mar 19 2003, 13:45
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David Nordin
post Mar 19 2003, 11:12
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Mastering Audio, the art and the science
Bob Katz

link: http://www.digido.com/portal/pmodule_id=11...der_page_id=66/

A great book, not only for those directly connected to mastering or engineering, but for understanding of procedures, processing and making of media.


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Gabriel
post Mar 19 2003, 13:47
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The Scientist and Engineer's Guide to Digital Signal Processing
Steven Smith

link:
http://www.dspguide.com/
(can also be downloaded)

Deals with "standard" dsp things, like transforms, convolutions and basic filtering
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menno
post Mar 19 2003, 16:17
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Numerical Recipes by William H. Press, Saul A. Teukolsky, William T. Vetterling and Brian P. Flannery
Digital version: http://www.ulib.org/webRoot/Books/Numerical_Recipes/

Always useful :-)

Menno

Edit: whoops, first book was already posted, sorry.

This post has been edited by menno: Mar 19 2003, 16:21
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Ivan Dimkovic
post Mar 19 2003, 23:51
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Applications of Digital Signal Processing to Audio and Acoustics. Kluwer Academic Publishers, March 1998. M. Kahrs and K. Brandenburg, editors.


Very nice book with first chapters dealing with PEAQ (perceptual evaluation of audio quality) and psychoacoustic audio coding (mostly about MP2/MP3 and AAC and ISO psychoacoustic model II)
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eyesonly
post May 8 2003, 18:19
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EDIT : Topic merged.

Hi,

I'm looking for some books on audio coding cos' i kinda have a problem I DUNNO HOW ALL THOSE AUDIO CODECS WORK!!! and i don't like it whis way. How can i trust a loosy audio codec when i don't have an idea how it works (in deatail)??? So I'm looking for books which start with basic things and go to the more advanced ones with some example C code (for example: how to write a PCM decoding engine, the basics of a psy model etc). AFAIK, subband based audio codecs and much simpler, so i'm looking for books that would cover it. Can U guys help ?


best regards

This post has been edited by Pio2001: Aug 4 2003, 23:01
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kritip
post May 8 2003, 18:34
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Just copied these out of my project Bibliography, they are all quite good:

Principles Of Digital Audio – Fourth Edition
Ken C. Pohlmann
McGraw-Hill Video/Audio Professional
ISBN 0-07-134819-0


Digital Audio Technology – Fourth Edition
A Guide to CD-Minidisc-SACD-DVDA.MP3.DAT
In association with SONY
ISBN 0-240-51654-0

MP3 The Definitive Guide
Scot Hacker
O’Reilly
ISBN 1-56592-661-7

Kristian
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SometimesWarrior
post May 9 2003, 10:50
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QUOTE (kritip @ May 8 2003 - 10:34 AM)
Principles Of Digital Audio – Fourth Edition
Ken C. Pohlmann
McGraw-Hill Video/Audio Professional
ISBN 0-07-134819-0

I found that book interesting enough to read it from cover-to-chapter-10 (which means, for a textbook, it's really good!)

Pohlmann's book was recommended to me by Bryant almost exactly one year ago when I asked the same question, and Frank Klemm agreed that it was a very good book to start with for digital audio enthusiasts.

A link that I stumbled on a while ago, which might still be relevant:
http://ccrma-www.stanford.edu/~bosse/proj/proj.html. The student talks about perceptual audio coders and how to build them, then codes one himself. I do believe the source-code is available. His code might be simpler to understand than a full-fledged implementation.
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QuantumKnot
post Apr 6 2004, 05:51
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Found this while googling for something else. Seems quite comprehensive. smile.gif

http://www.eas.asu.edu/~spanias/papers/pap...dspanias-00.pdf
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SebastianG
post Apr 6 2004, 17:46
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wow!
thanks for the link!

bye,
Sebi
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Pio2001
post Apr 6 2004, 21:04
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More in http://www.eas.asu.edu/~spanias/
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Halcyon
post May 7 2004, 15:22
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An Introduction to the Psychology of Hearing, Brian C.J. Moore, 5th edition, 2003
- Best introduction to psychoacoustics (most up-to-date). Recommended as a non-mathematical introduction.

Auditory Perception, Richard M. Warren, Cambridge University Press, 1999
- More of the same, with lots of overlap (get the above instead, imho)

The Intelligent Ear, Reinier Plomp, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002
- Very modern overall view with lots on speech understanding and some important points on high level research issues. Recommended (annoying postscript/printing errors though)

Introduction to Audiology, 8th ed., F.N. Martin & J.G. Clark, Allyn & Bacon, 2003
- Basic introduction to clinical audiology. Very layman approach. Understandable to most (BTW, only buy this if you're really into audiology, this is a periphery book for psychoacoustics, imho)

Introduction to Digital Audio, 2nd ed., John Watkinson, Focal Press, 2002
- Basic introduction to digital signal processing theory (and some applications). A condensed version of Art of Digital Audio (of sorts)

Digital Audio Technology, 4th ed., Sony, Focal Press, 2001
- Basics of digital audio (really rudimentary level) and more importantly how cd, dvd, sacd and minidisc work. Accurate reference for the CIRC diagram explanations (AFAIK)

Psychophysics - the Fundamentals, 3rd ed., George A. Gescheider, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1997
- Standard text on psychophysics. For me as a reference only. Haven't read it, so no futher comments.

Sensation and Perception, 6th ed., Bruce Goldstein, Wadsworth Publishing, 2001
- Basic perceptual psychology text, covering not only hearing, but vision and chemical senses as well. Many useful basic cognitive models, but I'd only recommend those more interested in cognition and sensory research in overall (the hearing part may be worth reading through though).

Signals and Perception, David Roberts (ed.), Open University, 2002
- Contains IMHO an excellent anatomical/neurological introduction to hearing. Also covers vision, touch, smell/taste, so there's stuff that's probably not of interest to HA members. However, if you can find this at your library, the articles 2-4 are really interesting and I'd recommend them to anyone seriously interested in understanding hearing. Very good illustration/images, imho.

BTW, apparently 'Principles of Digital audio' (Ken C. Pohlman) has errors in the CIRC encoder/decoder explanations. Haven't had time to verify this myself smile.gif

As for the Zwicker/Fastl, according to my professor it is not completely up-to-date, although a standard reference in the field (esp. for engineers). I have it, but it's been gathering dust, I'm afraid.


regards,
halcyon

This post has been edited by Halcyon: May 7 2004, 15:29
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linus
post May 7 2004, 18:45
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Care and Handling of CDs and DVDs: A Guide for Librarians and Archivists
by Fred R. Byers - October 2003

Online at:
http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/contents.html

Contents:
2. Ensuring That Your Digital Content Remains Available
3. Disc Structure
4. How Long Can You Store CDs and DVDs and Use Them Again?
5. Conditions That Affect CDs and DVDs
6. Cleaning

Edit : and you can get the pdf version here : http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub121abst.html

This post has been edited by Pio2001: May 7 2004, 20:42
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davince
post May 26 2004, 13:22
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Sorry, I've been an outsider, but I want to study for what's going on in compressing audio in to losslesss or lossy formats and some thing going with sound quality.

(I'm just a high school student, so my mathematics may not be so good)

Which book do you recommend for an outsider to start studying audio formats?

Can this be sufficient my need??

principles of digital audio
by pohlman

I hope you can give me some opions.

This post has been edited by davince: May 27 2004, 16:28
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wkwai
post Oct 6 2004, 14:51
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QUOTE (davince @ May 26 2004, 04:22 AM)
Sorry, I've been an outsider, but I want to study for what's going on in compressing audio in to losslesss or lossy formats and some thing going with sound quality.

(I'm just a high school student, so my mathematics may not be so good)

Which book do you recommend for an outsider to start studying audio formats?

Can this be sufficient my need??

principles of digital audio
by pohlman

I hope you can give me some opions.
*


High school ?? You need to start with complex numbers, matrixes, trigonometry etc-etc.. Your maths must be good.. because Digital Signal Processing is basically the implementation of mathematics in discrete form..

wkwai
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Halcyon
post Oct 12 2004, 20:27
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Pohlman is a decent thorough introductory text. Many courses use it as the primary book.

Don't be too afraid of the math. You'll grasp it along the way if you just stick along for the ride.

Some of the stuff is more difficult, but remember that most of the good dsp engineers don't even understand the mathematical models themselves. Sometimes it is just enough to apply them. However, for true understanding of the limits of your tools (programmatic algorithm implementations or any other models) you must understand their limits.

If you need introductory easy-to-start-with Calculus books, I can recommend some if you are interested in understanding the math part better.
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davince
post Oct 13 2004, 15:59
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QUOTE (Halcyon @ Oct 13 2004, 03:27 AM)
Pohlman is a decent thorough introductory text. Many courses use it as the primary book.

Don't be too afraid of the math. You'll grasp it along the way if you just stick along for the ride.

Some of the stuff is more difficult, but remember that most of the good dsp engineers don't even understand the mathematical models themselves. Sometimes it is just enough to apply them. However, for true understanding of the limits of your tools (programmatic algorithm implementations or any other models) you must understand their limits.

If you need introductory easy-to-start-with Calculus books, I can recommend some if you are interested in understanding the math part better.
*


Well, i'm interested in audio stream compressing part, so i think the math part may be a very important part.....

are there a lot of algorithms using the calculus?in compressing data?

thank you any way~~~
smile.gif
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Halcyon
post Oct 14 2004, 07:27
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Some texts (in English, I'm afraid) that could get you started:

Elementary Calculus: An Approach Using Infinitesimals
http://www.math.wisc.edu/~keisler/calc.html
- Easier to understand than most. Free pdf from the web. Please be aware that this books teaching uses a different approach based on inifitesmals, rather than the more common limits approach. Either one can be used, but most texts use limit approach, so you may have to go through that as well (not a hard job).

Applied Mathematics
http://www.its.caltech.edu/~sean/book/unabridged.html
- A bit more terse and can work as a reference. More applied than explanatory.

Multivariable Calculus
http://www.math.gatech.edu/~cain/notes/calculus.html
- Another easier (verbose) approach.

You might also find Information theory related notes on data compression useful at some point:
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/mackay/...ory/course.html

I'd recommend getting a good calculus book in your native language as well. It usually helps.

If you need more maths books later on, there are plenty of collections of free texts available on the web:

http://www.geocities.com/alex_stef/mylist.html
http://www.math.gatech.edu/~cain/textbooks/onlinebooks.html

regards,
halcyon
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davince
post Oct 15 2004, 10:42
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Thanks a lot.....
Though my English isn't very good, i'll try to know those things in the book...

thanks~~~
smile.gif
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gaboo
post Nov 9 2004, 21:44
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Not exactly a book, but the best online thing I found for statistics on rater agreement.


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QuantumKnot
post Jan 11 2006, 04:02
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Nice page with links to papers on many things like MDCT, TNS, etc.

http://www.ee.columbia.edu/~marios/courses...er_reviews.html
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dand
post Sep 6 2006, 19:54
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1. Mathematics of the Discrete Fourier Transform
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/


2. Introduction to Digital Filters
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/filters/


Great introductory courses by J.O.Smith III from Stanford University.
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Woodinville
post Sep 7 2006, 03:23
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Brian C. J. Moore as cited above.

William Yost's book on the Physiology of Hearing.

Norman Morrison's book on Fourier Analysis (but skip his software)

Rabiner and Crochiere "Multirate Digital Signal Processing"

H. Malvar's book on Lapped Transforms.

Jayant and Noll "Digital Coding of Waveforms"


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