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Want to Rip WAV to Blu Ray
Karri
post Dec 7 2013, 19:58
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I am digitizing my Record Collection and saving them as MP3 and WAV files. I want to rip my WAVs to Blu Ray Discs. Does any one out there know if there is any software that can do this? Most software is for ripping CD's. This way I can put about 20 LPs on a Disc and keep the better sound quality to play. I am also copying them to my NAS Drive, But because it is still a hard drive the life expectancy is 5 years or so where as a Blu Ray disc is the rest of my Life which is also a Hard Copy. I wouldn't want to loose my 1000 LPs to a dead HD. That is why I want to rip them to Blu Ray Disc. Now if I copy the wav files to Blu Ray I loose 10 GBs of space per disc and can only play individual songs at a time. Thanks in advance and have a great Day.
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includemeout
post Dec 7 2013, 20:42
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You mean burn them onto blu-ray discs?

You'll find umpteen posts throughout this community that will show you 'ripping' is exactly the opposite process.

Not to mention further reading will clarify why having a huge WAV library is NOT that great an idea - disc space and cataloguing-wise - even more so when you have lossless encoding to do that in a much more efficient fashion.


Edit: further clarification

This post has been edited by includemeout: Dec 7 2013, 20:45


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g0a
post Dec 7 2013, 20:49
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QUOTE
where as a Blu Ray disc is the rest of my Life which is also a Hard Copy


If you want to keep a larger amount of data till the end of your life, burning Blu Rays is probably one of the worst approaches. Unless you plan to burn lots of redundant copies, spread them to different locations, and check all of those copies every couple months a least.

For a low cost option, stick 3 reliable hard drives (I like those) in an external esata or usb3 enclosure and use Boar to keep those three in sync, checksummed, and validated. One is your primary data store, the other two off site offline backups at some other place you tend to visit rather frequently.
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includemeout
post Dec 7 2013, 21:01
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That Boar backup software did get my attention.

Care detailing why those HDs in particular take your fancy, personal choices aside!?

This post has been edited by db1989: Dec 7 2013, 22:00
Reason for edit: deleting unnecessary full quote of above post


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g0a
post Dec 7 2013, 21:44
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They are quiet, cool, emit low levels of vibration, don’t have firmware bugs I would be aware of (unlike the LCC nightmare with the WD green series), and it’s one of the few models in my life where I haven’t seen a single disk failing yet. I’m using about 20 of these for a year. But this is just personal experience and preference, in no way statistically relevant and it’s always best to do your own research.

Personally I stress test each new drive writing and validating Gutmann patterns in a loop for 2-4 weeks before actually using it using nwipe (DBAN, PartedMagic, etc). If pattern verification fails or SMART reports any sector relocation done or pending after this period, I return the drive.

Relevant statistics:

"after the first reallocation, drives are over 14 times more likely to fail within 60 days than drives without reallocation counts."

"after the first probational event, drives are 16 times more likely to fail within 60 days than drives with zero probational counts."

This post has been edited by db1989: Dec 7 2013, 22:00
Reason for edit: as above
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includemeout
post Dec 7 2013, 21:59
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Blimey! And me thinking that, speed aside, HD's were pretty much the same!

Thanks for the detailed explanation.

Even I can tell you know what you're talking about. Yet another reason for the OP to take heed of your advice regarding HD's being a much more practical solution thand BD's.


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Karri
post Dec 7 2013, 23:03
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Thanks all but I think we are getting off track of what I am looking for. I've built my own computer systems in the past with HD crashes, memory failure, power supply blow ups, etc, in fact I had an external HD solely for the purpose of backup, that I accessed maybe 10 times in 3 years and that 0ne crashed. All I want to do is burn my LP's to Blu Ray Or M media. That way I will always be able to access them and pull out my LP when I lose my MP 3 CD or HD failure. It doesn't bother me if I have 100 BD on a spindle. I will always have a hard copy. Sure takes up a lot less space and easier to move than a thousand albums. Thanks again
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g0a
post Dec 7 2013, 23:24
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I feel slightly bad for hijacking this into a storage discussion, but I feel I should complete it. If at some point a single disk can't hold your collection anymore, a good option to scale is to get a JBOD enclosure in whatever size you need (1,2) and use SnapRAID (1,2).

For semi static data, such as a home media collection, real time parity updates might neither be needed nor wanted. Snapshot RAID likely is a more attractive choice than traditional approaches in this situation. I'd recommend to invest some minutes to learn about it.

If you dislike direct attached storage, you could just make you own NAS using SnapRAID and something like this. Lastly, there are reasons I'd stay away from Drobo, UnRAID, and FlexRAID. Depending on use case, SnapRAID and Boar may overlap a bit in the guarantees they provide. It's up to your paranoia level to combine the two. I do. smile.gif
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DVDdoug
post Dec 7 2013, 23:35
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NOTE : I have not burned a Blu-Ray disc... yet.

If you simply want to burn MP3s WAVs or FLACs onto a Blu-Ray disc, all you need is burning software to copy the files onto the disc (plus and a Blu-Ray burner and a blank disc). ImgBurn can burn all kinds of discs, and I believe Windows 7 & 8 can also do it directly.

If you want to make an actual Blu-Ray disc that plays on all Blu-Ray players, you need Blu-Ray authoring software (something like Corel Video Studio) to create the standardized Blu-Ray file formats & file structure. Like I said, I haven't made a Blu-Ray disc yet, but with a DVD the most common procedure is to make a regular video DVD (using DVD authoring software) that shows a still image or a "slide show", usually with text indicating the artist, title, etc.

You might consider FLAC (or ALAC) instead of WAV. Besides taking slightly more than half the space, tagging (title, artist, album, etc.) is more common and more standardized.
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2Bdecided
post Dec 7 2013, 23:43
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QUOTE (DVDdoug @ Dec 7 2013, 22:35) *
NOTE : I have not burned a Blu-Ray disc... yet.
Me neither - by my experiences with CD-Rs and DVD+-Rs tell me that "burn, verify, put on shelf, forget" does not work as your only backup strategy.

Cheers,
David.
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g0a
post Dec 7 2013, 23:50
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QUOTE
I will always have a hard copy

I think you might have a wrong expectation about the life time of optical media. I have no hard data on that, but I've seen optical disks turning unreadable in just one year. Statistically, half of all hard drives won't survive six years. But the point is, be it BDs or HDDs, you need multiple copies in multiple locations. You need to monitor the media condition. And you need to be able to restore defects from parity or further copies. And in case of the later you need to know which copy is actually the good one (checksums). Unless you're planning to make this your full time job, doing this with BDs is just not realistic. If you're afraid of HDDs failing, just buy additional ones for more copies of your data.

QUOTE
that I accessed maybe 10 times in 3 years and that 0ne crashed

That may likely be why. As a rule of thumb, each used sector in a consumer grade disk should be read out once per month. Reading out data from a disk is the only way the disk itself can verify its own health and take counter actions (like remapping sectors to spare areas).

This post has been edited by g0a: Dec 8 2013, 00:09
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TBeck
post Dec 8 2013, 00:25
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Sorry if this is going off topic...
QUOTE (g0a @ Dec 7 2013, 22:44) *
They are quiet, cool, emit low levels of vibration, donít have firmware bugs I would be aware of (unlike the LCC nightmare with the WD green series), and itís one of the few models in my life where I havenít seen a single disk failing yet. Iím using about 20 of these for a year. But this is just personal experience and preference, in no way statistically relevant and itís always best to do your own research.

(Just in case someone isn't following the link: g0a is talking about the very silent Western Digital Red series, dedicated to NAS-use.)

I am a big fan of silent or better inaudible PCs. And the WD Red really seems to be the best option for a silent system. In my primary system i am using a Samsung HD502HI in a GUP Smart Drive silencer (although it seems to be a bit odd to pay twice as much for the silencer than for the HD...). In my scondary system im am using a WD Green 1 TB, which i have patched with the wdidle3-tool to avoid the LCC-nightmare.

Red would be my first choice for a new silent system, but the reduced TLER (Time-Limited Error Recovery: maximum time spend trying to read possibly faulty sectors) is bothering me.

Because you are having 20 Reds in use, i would like to ask you some questions:

1) Are you using them in single drive (desktop/external drive) or RAID configurations?
2) Have you encountered any unrecoverable errors?



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Karri
post Dec 8 2013, 02:55
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QUOTE (g0a @ Dec 7 2013, 14:50) *
QUOTE
I will always have a hard copy

I think you might have a wrong expectation about the life time of optical media. I have no hard data on that, but I've seen optical disks turning unreadable in just one year. Statistically, half of all hard drives won't survive six years. But the point is, be it BDs or HDDs, you need multiple copies in multiple locations. You need to monitor the media condition. And you need to be able to restore defects from parity or further copies. And in case of the later you need to know which copy is actually the good one (checksums). Unless you're planning to make this your full time job, doing this with BDs is just not realistic. If you're afraid of HDDs failing, just buy additional ones for more copies of your data.

QUOTE
that I accessed maybe 10 times in 3 years and that 0ne crashed

That may likely be why. As a rule of thumb, each used sector in a consumer grade disk should be read out once per month. Reading out data from a disk is the only way the disk itself can verify its own health and take counter actions (like remapping sectors to spare areas).



Thanks again
I have had no problems with optical media, hence CD's when they first came out in the mid 80's. Still playing them today. They've been in and out of car cd's and stereo cd players and boom boxes. I have multiple storage spots for my LP's to backup or copy to. My NAS Drive and PC 2 Second hard Drive. Oh buy the way I have 3 external HD's. No paranoia here. Now I'm using Nova Backup to backup to a BD Disc. I'm covered on all angles. All I want to do is burn some 20 WAV albums to a Blu Ray Disc and be able to play them. Is there software out there that can do this? I burn my MP3 to CD but its a waste of time to burn a WAV file to CD, too much MB's . Thanks again
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g0a
post Dec 8 2013, 10:52
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QUOTE
but the reduced TLER (Time-Limited Error Recovery: maximum time spend trying to read possibly faulty sectors) is bothering me.

I wouldn't be aware that there is a limit you can ask a drive to read a certain sector. Just the timeout the drive is giving itself in each iteration is shorter. So ddrescue, SpinRite, or whatever you might be using for recovery would just have to try a bit more often (which in case of the first one is a command line option).

QUOTE
1) Are you using them in single drive (desktop/external drive) or RAID configurations?

I'm using 3 sets of 7 disks each, each set has 2 parity drives. The primary array is ZFS (RAID-Z2), as I still have a few things, such as virtual machines, where real time parity is preferable. The other two sets are offline off site backups, sitting in cheap JBOD (port multiplier) cases using SnapRAID. I'm currently planning to isolate the virtual machines to a small SSD and consolidate the primary array to SnapRAID as well. It should reduce power consumption dramatically. Yes, that's a rather paranoid configuration. But I really want to keep my data for a long time.

QUOTE
2) Have you encountered any unrecoverable errors?

No.
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2Bdecided
post Dec 9 2013, 10:54
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Karri,

The word you're looking for is "author". At least, I think you want to author a BluRay disc. You certainly don't want to rip it.

If you Google author BluRay audio, you'll get plenty of hits. The first relevant one seems to be...
http://www.cirlinca.com/
(never used it).

Hope this helps.

Cheers,
David.

This post has been edited by 2Bdecided: Dec 9 2013, 10:55
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jkauff
post Dec 10 2013, 04:50
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This should be simple. Any burning software that can format a BD data disc can be used to create the discs. The 10GB loss (trivial on a BD) is due to formatting.

Once your WAV files are on the BD, your software music player should see the BD as nothing different from a hard drive. I have no idea why you can only play one song at a time. What player are you using, or are you using a Blu-ray player to play the files? If the latter, the player software should deal with a BD data disc the same way it deals with a USB thumb drive or any other storage medium. Test it with a few WAVs on a USB drive and see if it plays more than one song.
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2Bdecided
post Dec 10 2013, 11:14
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Oh, I assumed he wanted to author a disc to play in a stand-alone player. As you say, just burning a data disc should be trivial.

Cheers,
David.
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