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westgroveg
post Jul 9 2004, 08:57
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I am thinking of starting to take on the task of converting my, my friends, my family's LPs, 78s, 45s to digital, CD's, I would like to do this with the best possible quality & find an easy, standard way of doing it so my mind can be at peace the process was done as best as possible & I won't have to do it again. These are questions I have,

Question 1. What hardware would be best as far as quality/price? I was thinking of getting a Darla Recording Sound Card would this be a good choice? what about Phono (I have no idea about this)?

Question 2. I want to get the best possible quality so I will clean the Vinyl records, what's the best way to do this?

Question 3. What software should I use to record the audio? Cool Edit? Sound Forge? others?

Question 4. Should clicks and crackles be filtered? if so which is (are) the best tool(s)?

Question 5. Can anyone recommend a guide to read?


Thank you

This post has been edited by westgroveg: Jul 9 2004, 08:59
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Acid Orange Juic...
post Mar 20 2005, 06:19
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QUOTE (Joncat @ Mar 19 2005, 10:01 AM)
Why would you recommend direct drive as opposed to a DIY table or semi-audiophile table with an outboard motor? I have heard the Tech1200's can be modded to be pretty good but I know of very few high end tables that employ direct drive.

Why? I could explain to you...

I have used many turntables by around 10 years; some were direct drive and others were belt drive... Most of them were of the 80's (vintage turntables). In the decade of the 80's were constructed excellent commercial turntables (mainly Technics and Pionner were very good) to an accessible price.

QUOTE (Joncat @ Mar 19 2005, 10:01 AM)
... I know of very few high end tables that employ direct drive.

Would be you badly informed then... as I said before, in the 80's (as example) the majority of the turntables were direct drive, and they work very good.

I tested around many of these turntables, and I prefer those of direct drive. Why?
Because the belt drives have more wow and flutter (speed variations) than the direct drive turntables. This defect is stronger with the passage of the years... The belt stretches with time and use, and produces important variations in the speed of the turntable. You have that change the belt around of each 3 years of continue use, when this occurs you can perceive very easy that the turntable was significantly slower (with the old belt) than with the new belt.

The direct drive motors are Servo controlled. The Servo mechanism is a electronic system that compare the output in real time (in this case the motor speed) with a reference. This reference is the "desired speed". The idea of the Servo mechanism is to maintain the output (motor speed) EXACTLY EQUAL to the reference (desired speed)... The Servo mechanism works in real time, comparing ALL THE TIME the motor speed (output) with the reference (desired speed). As a result of this the motor speed is CONSTANT all the time, because any minimal possible speed variation is corrected inmediately by the Servo mechanism. This feature of auto correction is not the case of the belt drive turntables. The possible speed variations of a direct drive motor as a consequence of many years of use is NULL. Other good thing: Many good vintage direct drive turntables have the reference controlled by a QUARTZ crystal, this type of motor is more precise and accurate.

Another FUN myth is this: "The belt drive outboard motors are a lot better than direct drive internal motors".
Don't exist scientist evidence of this (or at least credible). I believe very seriously that this MYTH is product of the lack of knowledge of some people of as the basic electronics works, as too the general Servo electronic mechanism theory.

The normal noises in any turntable (as example "rumble") are more controlled and reduced (as a result of the Servo mechanism correction circuit) than the belt drive turntables.

This post has been edited by Acid Orange Juice: Mar 20 2005, 06:20
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Joncat
post Mar 20 2005, 17:55
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I still don't buy it. I do agree those tables were well made. I had an old Kenwood and those few Sansui models were nice too, as well as Pioneer.

First of all, the Stanton, Technics, Denon etc. TT's are made with DJ's in mind. High tracking forces, pitch correction, high torqu motors, to be used with high output MM cartidges. Do you think a rumble is really factored into the design? If you have something creating vibration under the platter, how does Quartz tech. help remove the vibrations; seems like simple physics to me.

Which tables have you tested and compared?

Second, if you are using an unshielded cartridge such as a Grado, the further away you place the motor the better.

Third, the belts used today have the advantage of being composed of stronger and better engineered materials; after three years I doubt a perceptible difference would be noticable.

Fourth, direct drives would seem to be easy to implement into a TT, more than
a complicated belt drive system which employs and outboard motor. Then why isn't everyone doing it. I;d argue that the engineers of the Rega's, VPI's, Michelle's, etc. have examined this rather throughly. Yeah, there is a LOT of hype in the hi-fi world but not in this regard.

JC


QUOTE (Acid Orange Juice @ Mar 19 2005, 09:19 PM)
QUOTE (Joncat @ Mar 19 2005, 10:01 AM)
Why would you recommend direct drive as opposed to a DIY table or semi-audiophile table with an outboard motor? I have heard the Tech1200's can be modded to be pretty good but I know of very few high end tables that employ direct drive.

Why? I could explain to you...

I have used many turntables by around 10 years; some were direct drive and others were belt drive... Most of them were of the 80's (vintage turntables). In the decade of the 80's were constructed excellent commercial turntables (mainly Technics and Pionner were very good) to an accessible price.

QUOTE (Joncat @ Mar 19 2005, 10:01 AM)
... I know of very few high end tables that employ direct drive.

Would be you badly informed then... as I said before, in the 80's (as example) the majority of the turntables were direct drive, and they work very good.

I tested around many of these turntables, and I prefer those of direct drive. Why?
Because the belt drives have more wow and flutter (speed variations) than the direct drive turntables. This defect is stronger with the passage of the years... The belt stretches with time and use, and produces important variations in the speed of the turntable. You have that change the belt around of each 3 years of continue use, when this occurs you can perceive very easy that the turntable was significantly slower (with the old belt) than with the new belt.

The direct drive motors are Servo controlled. The Servo mechanism is a electronic system that compare the output in real time (in this case the motor speed) with a reference. This reference is the "desired speed". The idea of the Servo mechanism is to maintain the output (motor speed) EXACTLY EQUAL to the reference (desired speed)... The Servo mechanism works in real time, comparing ALL THE TIME the motor speed (output) with the reference (desired speed). As a result of this the motor speed is CONSTANT all the time, because any minimal possible speed variation is corrected inmediately by the Servo mechanism. This feature of auto correction is not the case of the belt drive turntables. The possible speed variations of a direct drive motor as a consequence of many years of use is NULL. Other good thing: Many good vintage direct drive turntables have the reference controlled by a QUARTZ crystal, this type of motor is more precise and accurate.

Another FUN myth is this: "The belt drive outboard motors are a lot better than direct drive internal motors".
Don't exist scientist evidence of this (or at least credible). I believe very seriously that this MYTH is product of the lack of knowledge of some people of as the basic electronics works, as too the general Servo electronic mechanism theory.

The normal noises in any turntable (as example "rumble") are more controlled and reduced (as a result of the Servo mechanism correction circuit) than the belt drive turntables.
*



This post has been edited by Joncat: Mar 20 2005, 17:58
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optimali
post Jun 5 2005, 05:57
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I have an Akai DD c. late 80's with I think a replacement cartridge that I think was nothing special at the time but ok. Only thing is I've always had this problem with certain records where the treble gets a lot of stuff added on top of it and sounds awful.

Can anyone tell me a method for aligning the cartridge? Should I get a new cartridge - it's been a while...

Thanks.


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Posts in this topic
- westgroveg   LP to CD Conversion   Jul 9 2004, 08:57
- - Jan S.   This guide is vrey good: http://www.delback.co.uk/...   Jul 9 2004, 11:21
- - magic75   If price is an issue... Q3: I like Waverepair, for...   Jul 9 2004, 11:39
- - Pio2001   QUOTE (westgroveg @ Jul 9 2004, 08:57 AM)Ques...   Jul 9 2004, 12:31
|- - DonP   QUOTE (Pio2001 @ Jul 9 2004, 06:31 AM)If you ...   Nov 23 2004, 20:24
|- - 2Bdecided   QUOTE (DonP @ Nov 23 2004, 07:24 PM)I have a ...   Nov 24 2004, 12:36
- - toomuch   "Question 4. Should clicks and crackles be fi...   Jul 9 2004, 15:37
- - dev0   Personally I always leave the recording untouched ...   Jul 9 2004, 15:46
- - DerEber   me too .... untouched!! in some rear cases...   Jul 9 2004, 16:50
- - JeanLuc   What really rocks are the Waves DX Plug-Ins X-Hum,...   Jul 9 2004, 17:27
- - gordo   I've embarked on the same thing and for what i...   Jul 9 2004, 17:59
|- - magic75   QUOTE (gordo @ Jul 9 2004, 08:59 AM)Prior to ...   Nov 23 2004, 13:07
|- - gordo   There may be an issue for a non-integer ratio samp...   Nov 23 2004, 19:59
- - ChangFest   I get decent results using my cheap Technics SL-B...   Nov 23 2004, 17:38
|- - rhadinocentrus   Hello Changfest, ? I pickup subsonics on your sam...   Nov 23 2004, 22:54
- - Gray_Wolf   Hi ; I have recorded many LP's to my PC with...   Nov 24 2004, 01:46
|- - 2Bdecided   QUOTE (Gray_Wolf @ Nov 24 2004, 12:46 AM)Hi...   Nov 24 2004, 14:13
|- - cliveb   QUOTE (2Bdecided @ Nov 24 2004, 02:13 PM)A lo...   Nov 25 2004, 12:04
|- - auldyin   I also have been using Wave Corrector and have to ...   Nov 25 2004, 17:01
- - Vietwoojagig   QUOTE (westgroveg @ Jul 9 2004, 08:57 AM)Ques...   Nov 24 2004, 14:40
- - ChangFest   QUOTE A lot of people on the old Cool Edit forums ...   Nov 24 2004, 18:30
- - dvautier   The most important consideration in LP to CD conve...   Mar 1 2005, 01:28
- - Joncat   Why would you recommend direct drive as opposed to...   Mar 19 2005, 17:01
- - Acid Orange Juice   QUOTE (Joncat @ Mar 19 2005, 10:01 AM)Why wou...   Mar 20 2005, 06:19
|- - Joncat   I still don't buy it. I do agree those tables ...   Mar 20 2005, 17:55
|- - optimali   I have an Akai DD c. late 80's with I think a ...   Jun 5 2005, 05:57
- - dvautier   This has been a real fun thread. I love the discu...   Mar 30 2005, 20:06
|- - _Prelude_   QUOTE (dvautier @ Mar 30 2005, 01:06 PM)This ...   Jun 11 2005, 20:39
- - snookerdoodle   I was looking for a stylus for my dad this weekend...   Jun 13 2005, 14:47
- - 2Bdecided   Isn't it amazing how much new equipment is ava...   Jun 14 2005, 11:14
- - optimali   For ppl who want to align their cartridges, here...   Jun 14 2005, 17:12


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