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Recommend me a Win32 command-line sound recorder
Axon
post Jun 9 2008, 17:38
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I'd like to dabble in doing scheduled recordings from a local FM station I'm quite fond of. Their schedule is posted online, and they're public, so I can feasibly use the Windows job scheduling service to make it all work.

Unfortunately I've looked high and low and I can't seem to find a command line util to record audio off a sound card. Before I go off and write my own, does anybody here have suggestions? Obviously open source is vastly preferred to freeware/shareware/paid. And the util has to be at least competent (Windows Sound Recorder technically works off the command line but it only records up to 60 seconds on XP).
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smok3
post Jun 9 2008, 17:50
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mencoder/mplayer maybe? (next would be sox and ffmpeg), i have no clue how the cmd would look like and if it is even possible.

This post has been edited by smok3: Jun 9 2008, 17:58


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PANIC: CPU 1: Cache Error (unrecoverable - dcache data) Eframe = 0x90000000208cf3b8
NOTICE - cpu 0 didn't dump TLB, may be hung
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M
post Jun 9 2008, 19:29
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Try LineInCode, linked from the bottom of the LiveInCode page. I've successfully used it for such projects in the past, as well as direct-to-disc real-time CD recording (which I described here).

- M.
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tycho
post Jun 10 2008, 01:54
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To do scheduled recordings from an FM station, I'd rather use the freeware RaimaRadio. It went shareware, but you can still get the last freeware version 1.46 a few places, like http://www.freewarefiles.com/RaimaRadio_program_34826.html

One nice thing is that this program make use of the window job scheduling service, so it won't need to run in the background.
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WonderSlug
post Jun 10 2008, 02:19
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I use Windows Sound Recorder to record audio/music up to 60 minutes all the time.

What I did was create a bunch of "scratch" WAV files, of varying lengths, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes. I made sure the WAV files were CD audio standard 44100 Hz 16-bit stereo PCM.

It should be about 10 MB per minute, so a 5 minute WAV will be 50 MB, 10 minutes is 100 MB, up to 600 MB for 60 minutes.

Make sure you have enough RAM to store the entire WAV file in memory, otherwise you might be swapping to disk a lot. So, 1 GB of system RAM is recommended for 30 min to 60 minutes.

Choose the WAV file that can cover the entire length of the recording time you want. Load that WAV file in Windows Sound Recorder and then make sure that the position slider is at the beginning.

Click on the record button to begin recording and then stop it when you want, or let it continue.

Move the slider to the start and ending points of the audio you want to keep. You can then use Sound Recorder to delete sections before and after the slider as needed. Use "Save As" to save the results to a new WAV file otherwise you'll overwrite the scratch WAV file needlessly.

This post has been edited by WonderSlug: Jun 10 2008, 02:19
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Axon
post Jun 10 2008, 04:18
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Thanks all. I got LiveInCode working and happily encoding directly to FLAC. I just recorded a 2-hour performance at 32khz, yielding a FLAC bitrate of 471kbps. Woot!

I'm just using at directly from the command line, fwiw.
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Glenn Gundlach
post Jun 10 2008, 04:49
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QUOTE (WonderSlug @ Jun 9 2008, 17:19) *
I use Windows Sound Recorder to record audio/music up to 60 minutes all the time.

What I did was create a bunch of "scratch" WAV files, of varying lengths, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes. I made sure the WAV files were CD audio standard 44100 Hz 16-bit stereo PCM.

It should be about 10 MB per minute, so a 5 minute WAV will be 50 MB, 10 minutes is 100 MB, up to 600 MB for 60 minutes.

Make sure you have enough RAM to store the entire WAV file in memory, otherwise you might be swapping to disk a lot. So, 1 GB of system RAM is recommended for 30 min to 60 minutes.

Choose the WAV file that can cover the entire length of the recording time you want. Load that WAV file in Windows Sound Recorder and then make sure that the position slider is at the beginning.

Click on the record button to begin recording and then stop it when you want, or let it continue.

Move the slider to the start and ending points of the audio you want to keep. You can then use Sound Recorder to delete sections before and after the slider as needed. Use "Save As" to save the results to a new WAV file otherwise you'll overwrite the scratch WAV file needlessly.


Back in '98 when I ran a Pentium 166 I had no problems with disc drives keeping up with audio recording. I currently record HD MPEG-2 files to disc at 16 megabits/second with no problems and have recorded 3 hour shows. 20 gigs. No big deal. Audio at 1.4 megabits should not be an issue at all.

G
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BassBinDevil
post Jun 14 2008, 02:41
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QUOTE (Axon @ Jun 9 2008, 11:38) *
I'd like to dabble in doing scheduled recordings from a local FM station I'm quite fond of. Their schedule is posted online, and they're public, so I can feasibly use the Windows job scheduling service to make it all work.


The beta version of Audacity supports scheduled recordings. I've had some problems with reopening saved projects, though, so I'd suggest you export the recording to wav or MP3 before closing the project.

HardDiskOgg Recorder can be invoked from the command line for scheduled recordings.
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ae6zw
post May 21 2011, 21:19
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I used lineincode v 2.10 ( command line version of liveincode ) and lame 3.89 of compiled exe version file

linco -dev 0 -B 16 -C 1 -R 8000 -q 2 -D 04:30:00 | lame --highpass 300 -r -x -s 8 --r3mix -m m - radio-show-name-%date%.mp3

the setting -R sample rate at linco and -s setting at lame need to be adjusted, if recorded audio is slow or fast , it need adjustment
-B 16 of linco seems like always need to be 16 bit , did try 8 bit, but it did not work.
-dev 0 seeting need to be changed if the pc has more than 1 audio input devices.
%date% can be used, if date format is adjusted so, it does not have space or '/' , I used date format of YYYY-MM-DD format , changed in windows regional and language setting.
I use windows XP prof version, with sp2
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woody_woodward
post May 21 2011, 21:49
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You might also find this service useful, though it is not what you asked for.

http://dar.fm/

You can schedule radio recordings, and then stream or download them at your convenience. I have been using this service for a few weeks now. Simple. Reliable. Recommended.

Woody

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