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DTS Audio CDs
duchski2
post Apr 1 2010, 17:53
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I searched the web for a definitive answer but still could not find definitive specs for what is called DTS CD i.e. CD encoded with audio in DTS format.

As I understand DTS files are "encapsulated" in wav format so to the CD player thay look like "normal" wav files i.e. 16 bit, 44.1khz etc but then inside the fake wav file is a DTS encoded audio info. Now, what are the specs for the actual DTS stream inside the "wav" file i.e what DTS bit rates, sampling freq. etc are allowed?




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DVDdoug
post Apr 1 2010, 20:39
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I think this is a "hack". So, I don't believe there are any formal specs or standards. (This isn't part of the CD, DVD-video, DVD-Audio, or Blu-Ray spec.)

SurCode uses a bitrate of 1234kps.
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duchski2
post Apr 1 2010, 23:08
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QUOTE (DVDdoug @ Apr 1 2010, 15:39) *
I think this is a "hack". So, I don't believe there are any formal specs or standards. (This isn't part of the CD, DVD-video, DVD-Audio, or Blu-Ray spec.)

SurCode uses a bitrate of 1234kps.



DVDDoug,

It is definetely kind of a hack as it circumvents CD-DA specs by hiding not sanctioned by Red Book DTS info inside a fully compliant CD-DA.
You could say DTS CDs are fully compliant recordings of white noise wink.gif and as such they have to APPEAR as being 44.1khz/16bit/1411kbit streams.

When you are sying Surcode produced a 1234kps file do you mean the wav or the actual bit rate of the "encapsulated" DTS stream?

Also, do you know the sampling frequency of an actual DTS stream inside the pseudo-wave? Is it 44.1Khz or 48Khz?

This post has been edited by duchski2: Apr 1 2010, 23:09
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Skelsgard
post Apr 2 2010, 07:21
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The files to be encoded (WAVs) have to be 44.1 kHz 16 bit up to 5.1 channels (1411 kbps).
The final kbps used in the DTS WAV file is 1234 effective kbps but the encoding is done at 1411kbps. The difference between the 1411 kbps and the 1234 kbps can be explained by a signal level reduction intended to avoid saturation of speakers.
The final DTS WAV is 44.1 kHz.


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duchski2
post Apr 2 2010, 18:18
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QUOTE (Skelsgard @ Apr 2 2010, 02:21) *
The files to be encoded (WAVs) have to be 44.1 kHz 16 bit up to 5.1 channels (1411 kbps).
The final kbps used in the DTS WAV file is 1234 effective kbps but the encoding is done at 1411kbps. The difference between the 1411 kbps and the 1234 kbps can be explained by a signal level reduction intended to avoid saturation of speakers.
The final DTS WAV is 44.1 kHz.



Thanks so much Skelsgard. I have several DTS files as .dts which are 48000 and was wondering if there is any way to encode them to dtswave i.e. .wav so they can be burned into a CD-DA compliant ROM... Based on what you wrote I understand that I would have to first downsample them to 44.1... Is that a lossy process? What is the best tool to extract wavs from .dts file and then downsample to 44.1K? I have SureCode Pro to reencode files to dtswav...
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