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Realtek ALC665 HD Audio + 2.1 stereo speaker = no sound!, How to connect using Digital S/PDIF?
greynol
post Dec 27 2010, 06:55
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Again, assuming that the connection is not optical, are we sure the digital out on the laptop is providing proper S/PDIF signal and not TTL?

burnett_s, have you looked at the waveform of the output when it is configured to deliver S/PDIF? I suppose I should back up a bit and ask if you see red light coming out of the headphone jack.

This post has been edited by greynol: Dec 27 2010, 07:19


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andy o
post Dec 27 2010, 07:52
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OK, if SoundBlaster cards used to have a coax SPDIF out in a 3.5mm form, then that makes even more sense. I've never seen these combined outputs with coax rather than optical SPDIF out. Creative liked to do things its way, its 7.1 cables were a "proprietary" mess, for instance. So, creative included this "adapter" that would work with SoundBlaster cards.

To the OP, it is easy enough to look for that little red light.
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andy o
post Dec 27 2010, 11:00
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QUOTE (greynol @ Dec 26 2010, 19:01) *
QUOTE (andy o @ Dec 26 2010, 18:41) *
I've always seen that they combine optical with analog, which makes more sense.

Why would that make more sense?

I presumed (perhaps wrongly?) that sending digital electrical signal to a headphone by mistake could damage the headhpones? Never tried it though, cause I've never had a SB card and never seen this in any other devices I've owned.
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[JAZ]
post Dec 27 2010, 16:35
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One thing i haven't seen mentioned in this thread, but that it is of special importance in Vista/Seven is.... Have you selected the Digital out as the soundcard in the application?
Concretely, what i mean is that the analog output and the digital output are placed as two different soundcards, and using the erroneous one will not output any sound.

In my laptop (a 2008 Acer model) i also have a headphone-SP/DIF. I don't have a digital receiver so I've never tried the digital out, but I know that if i selected the wrong one by mistake, i didn't get sound.
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andy o
post Dec 27 2010, 16:42
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I was gonna mention it, but the control panel usually synchronizes with the Windows Sound settings. I've seen this with Realtek and IDT devices.
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kritip
post Dec 27 2010, 18:38
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As mentioned multiple times, set it to digital out and see if you get some kind of light coming out the jack. Sometimes they have an internal cover so to help reduce dust, so you may only see a very small amount of light.

A 3.5mm optical and analogue combo are common, as are the "cables".



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Alex B
post Dec 27 2010, 23:42
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Someone at an unofficial German Dell forum claims that it has an optical SPDIF output: http://www.dell-forum.de/dell-xps-forum-no...2447-spdif.html.

I have only seen an electrical S/PDIF miniplug connector on some old SoundBlaster cards. The laptops I have seen have had an optical "combo" miniplug connector.

This post has been edited by Alex B: Dec 27 2010, 23:43


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burnett_s
post Dec 27 2010, 23:56
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QUOTE (andy o @ Dec 27 2010, 03:52) *
OK, if SoundBlaster cards used to have a coax SPDIF out in a 3.5mm form, then that makes even more sense. I've never seen these combined outputs with coax rather than optical SPDIF out. Creative liked to do things its way, its 7.1 cables were a "proprietary" mess, for instance. So, creative included this "adapter" that would work with SoundBlaster cards.

To the OP, it is easy enough to look for that little red light.


I can't see any red light because the only way to activate SPDIF is connecting the cable. There's no option in the soundcard control panel to activate or disable SPDIF.

About my speakers:
My 2.1 speakers are from Creative Labs, and the RCA cable and RCA to mini plug cable came with the speakers to work only in Sound Blaster soundcards.
The Digital Input is Coaxial Digital. The RCA-To-Mini Plug Cable is supposed to work only in Sound Blaster Audigy Series, Sound Blaster Live or Sound Blaster Extigy).
So, the speakers and my previous Sound Blaster Audigy soundcard are coaxial digital (not optical), and that's why the RCA-To-Mini plug cable works well there.

Now, I wonder if my Dell notebook really has an optical output because in the Realtek Digital Output properties says Left pannel: Optical connector





QUOTE ([JAZ] @ Dec 27 2010, 12:35) *

One thing i haven't seen mentioned in this thread, but that it is of special importance in Vista/Seven is.... Have you selected the Digital out as the soundcard in the application?
Concretely, what i mean is that the analog output and the digital output are placed as two different soundcards, and using the erroneous one will not output any sound.

In my laptop (a 2008 Acer model) i also have a headphone-SP/DIF. I don't have a digital receiver so I've never tried the digital out, but I know that if i selected the wrong one by mistake, i didn't get sound.


There's no such option. The Digital out is supposed to activate itself as soon as a cable is connected to SPDIF connector.
That option was available in my old Sound Blaster Audity soundcard. (Digital only)



Anyway I give up, I'll contact Dell support and come back latter with an answer.

Thank you so much everybody for your help.
Gonzalo


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greynol
post Dec 28 2010, 00:13
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The last dialog screen is the missing piece to the puzzle. With that in mind, Apesbrain already gave you the complete answer in Post #9:
QUOTE (Apesbrain @ Dec 26 2010, 13:00) *
I believe you need these three components to connect the optical digital output of your laptop to the coax digital input of your speakers:

1. 1/8 to Toslink adaptor/cable
2. Optical to Coax Converter
3. The coax RCA cable you already have.

All in all, a lot easier to connect via analog and I really doubt you'd hear any difference into 2.1-channel. For 5.1 surround sound you'd have to be connected via S/PDIF.

The sentence I took the liberty to put in bold type might be your best option, unless there are demonstrable issues with this method.

This post has been edited by greynol: Dec 28 2010, 00:37


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burnett_s
post Dec 28 2010, 00:36
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Yes, in fact I'm using analog right now and it sounds great.

I found something interesting here, but it's from 2009 and the Realtek driver is not the same, anyway here it is:
http://support.dell.com//support/topics/gl...p;s=gen&cs=

I'll contact Dell support and come back later,
Thank you very kindly


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andy o
post Dec 28 2010, 01:37
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From the Realtek control panels I've seen before, you can probably disable automatic input detection, so you could turn on/off manually the optical output and see if it's working. Is there any such option? Or, if you already have an optical cable with a 3.5mm end, you can probably connect it and see if light comes out the other end. I don't think SPDIF can tell if there's an actual device connected on the other end, so it should transmit anyway.

This post has been edited by andy o: Dec 28 2010, 01:40
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DailyVenture
post Mar 17 2011, 03:12
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THIS IS THE CABLE!



After dealing with the same issue for the last couple of weeks and trying the digital coaxial (and drivers, codecs, etc) I've used on a previous system, I can say with absolutely certainty that the SPDIF output of a Dell L701X laptop is an OPTICAL signal.

You'll need a Toslink to Miniplug cable. What is confusing is that the miniplug optical connector is not very common, but this is indeed a combo port since stereo analog headphones and speakers can also be connected through this port.

System : Windows 7 64-bit

What a humbug! headbang.gif

QUOTE (kritip @ Dec 27 2010, 09:38) *
As mentioned multiple times, set it to digital out and see if you get some kind of light coming out the jack. Sometimes they have an internal cover so to help reduce dust, so you may only see a very small amount of light.

A 3.5mm optical and analogue combo are common, as are the "cables".


I didn't see a light, altough the output was enabled.
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burnett_s
post Dec 9 2013, 06:24
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QUOTE (Apesbrain @ Dec 26 2010, 18:00) *
I believe you need these three components to connect the optical digital output of your laptop to the coax digital input of your speakers:

1. 1/8 to Toslink adaptor/cable
2. Optical to Coax Converter
3. The coax RCA cable you already have.

All in all, a lot easier to connect via analog and I really doubt you'd hear any difference into 2.1-channel. For 5.1 surround sound you'd have to be connected via S/PDIF.


Well, the S/PDIF of the laptop was a Toslink port.
But like you suggested, I'll keep my connection via analog into 2.1 channel.
Thank you for your reply, you're right!

QUOTE
Posted by jimco on Dell Support Forums

The laptop has a Toslink port. So to connect to the Cambridge speakers you need a device or adapter to convert Toslink to coax. You can google Toslink to coaxial adapter. You need an optical cable to go from the laptop to the Toslink to coaxial adapter. If the Toslink to coaxial adapter has a standard size port then you will need a mini-TOSLINK adapter, or a cable with a mini on one end and standard size on the other. Here is a picture of a mini-TOSLINK adapter


Optical Toslink to Coaxial (RCA) Digital Audio Converter


Toslink to Mini Digital Optical SPDIF Audio Cable


Subwoofer Cable - RCA to RCA


mini-TOSLINK adapter 3.5 mm


Optical Toslink to Coaxial (RCA) Digital Audio connection



Thank you very much for your replies !!
Hope this post helps to somebody else.


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burnett_s
post Dec 9 2013, 15:56
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After all, according to the XPS 17 (L702x) Audio Setup Guide, the S/PDIF of my L701x laptop was a Toslink port.
S/PDIF OUT on the laptop is a Toslink OPTICAL signal output that doubles as a headphone output.
The S/PDIF ports on the L701x and L702x are the same.



Thank you very much for all your help once again!

Take care,
Gonzalo


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