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Transferring a digital file to cassette
9876098
post Jun 22 2011, 08:04
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There is a wealth of information about transferring music from cassettes onto one's computer in digital form. Basically, one would attach 2 RCA plugs (red and white) into the cassette player and a ,125 inch stereo plug into the line-in port on the computer, then hit play on the cassette player as software is used to record input from the line-in port, if I understand correctly.

After a lot of searching, I've yet to find any information about transferring a digital file to a cassette. How would I do that? I know that I could merely play the music from the computer speakers while recording it with the cassette player, but I'm looking for a method that would result in higher quality- doing it like that would result in a lot of undesirable background noise.

I apologise if the answer to this is obvious; I have nearly no knowledge about things like this.
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probedb
post Jun 22 2011, 08:23
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Do you mean take the line-out from the PC and plug it into the rec-in on your tape deck? Maybe going via an amp?
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pdq
post Jun 22 2011, 13:38
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If ypur cassette player has RCA plugs for line out then it probably also has RCA plugs for line in. Take the same cable that you were using to copy from cassette to digital, switch the RCA plugs from line out to line in and the stereo plug from your sound card's line in to line out.
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9876098
post Jun 23 2011, 02:53
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Ah, that makes perfect sense. The only audio output connector on my computer is the headphone connector. I have a stereo line-in connector, but not a stereo line-out connector. Is there any way to do this without having to borrow the computer of someone else?
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pawelq
post Jun 23 2011, 03:55
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Try the headphone connector, it should work as well or almost as well as line-out.

Make sure you don't overload the tape deck's inputs.


--------------------
Ceterum censeo, there should be an "%is_stop_after_current%".
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9876098
post Jun 23 2011, 07:21
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What could cause the tape deck's inputs to be overloaded? How would I avoid overloading them?
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bandpass
post Jun 23 2011, 08:23
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  1. Set the PC volume control to zero.
  2. Press PAUSE+RECORD on the tape deck.
  3. Start the PC playing the loudest track you wish to record.
  4. Increase the PC playback volume until the tape deck VU meters just lightly & occasionally touch the red.
  5. Stop both devices.
System is now ready to record tracks.
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9876098
post Jun 25 2011, 03:31
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Thank you for all the help. I believe that I now know everything that I need to know in order to do this. Once I obtain the appropriate connector, I'll give this a whirl.
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d_headshot
post Jun 30 2011, 05:10
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QUOTE (bandpass @ Jun 23 2011, 02:23) *
  1. Set the PC volume control to zero.
  2. Press PAUSE+RECORD on the tape deck.
  3. Start the PC playing the loudest track you wish to record.
  4. Increase the PC playback volume until the tape deck VU meters just lightly & occasionally touch the red.
  5. Stop both devices.
System is now ready to record tracks.


How low is too low for decreasing the PC volume when monitoring the VU meters? A lot of music these days is so damn loud and compressed, the red is being pegged constantly so wouldn't you have to compensate for that?
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AndyH-ha
post Jun 30 2011, 08:28
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Any given peak level on the computer should produce the same reading at the cassette deck each and every time it occurs. If 70% of a track is at 0dBfs digital, the same 70% should read at the maximum recording level you choose to use on the tape deck. For what do you want to compensate?

It is considerably easier to record from an audio editor, where the entire thing can be seen on screen before you start. Then you can easily choose a maximum level segment to play and set your tape input levels before you begin the recording.

If the player allows you to play a selected section in loop mode, zoom in to a suitable section, and select just a few seconds. Played over and over you will have a very convenient signal with which to adjust the tape input.
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9876098
post Jul 21 2011, 02:58
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I have one more quick question. Would I be able to do this from any device that has a headphone output, such as an MP3 player or radio?
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trout
post Jul 21 2011, 07:36
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Yes. The type of device will typically not matter. In general, if an analog audio signal can be sent through wires to a set of ordinary headphones, then wires can just as easily be routed to the input of a recording device.


aside:
If you ever hear the phrase "the analog hole" in a discussion about copy protection or digital rights management (DRM), this is the basic method they're talking about.

This post has been edited by trout: Jul 21 2011, 08:04
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9876098
post Jul 23 2011, 03:50
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Ok, thanks for the answer to that question. I've heard of the analog hole before, but I've never needed to or known how to utilize it until now (less artists sell their music on cassettes these days). Regarding DRM and the DMCA, it's one reason to never buy (most) electronics that were manufactured in or shipped to the U.S.

This post has been edited by 9876098: Jul 23 2011, 03:52
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